Google translations (NOT 100% accurate).

BARBADOS

Barbados first competed at the Summer Olympic Games in 1968, and has participated in each Games since then, missing only the 1980 Summer Olympics by participating in the American-led boycott of those games. The country's only Olympic medal to date is a bronze won by sprinter Obadele Thompson in the men's 100 metres at the 2000 Summer Olympics. Barbados competed as part of the West Indies Federation in 1960. Barbadian athlete James Wedderburn was part of the 4 x 400m relay team which won the bronze medal that year.

A Little History

Barbados is a sovereign island country in the Lesser Antilles, in the Americas. It is 34 kilometres (21 miles) in length and up to 23 km (14 mi) in width, covering an area of 432 km2 (167 sq mi). It is situated in the western area of the North Atlantic and 100 km (62 mi) east of the Windward Islands and the Caribbean Sea; therein, it is about 168 km (104 mi) east of the islands of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines and 400 km (250 mi) north-east of Trinidad and Tobago. Barbados is outside of the principal Atlantic hurricane belt. Its capital is Bridgetown.

Inhabited by Kalingo people since the 13th century, and prior to that by other Amerindians, Barbados was visited by Spanish navigators in the late 15th century and claimed for the Spanish Crown. It first appeared in a Spanish map in 1511. The Portuguese visited the island in 1536, but they left it unclaimed, with their only remnants being an introduction of wild hogs for a good supply of meat whenever the island was visited. An English ship, the Olive Blossom, arrived in Barbados in 1625; its men took possession of it in the name of King James I. In 1627, the first permanent settlers arrived from England, and it became an English and later British colony.

In 1966, Barbados became an independent state and Commonwealth realm with the British Monarch (presently Queen Elizabeth II) as hereditary head of state. Due to their colonial history and connection to the United Kingdom, even after independence, it is sometimes referred to as Little England. It has a population of 280,121 people, mostly of African descent. Despite being classified as an Atlantic island, Barbados is considered to be a part of the Caribbean, where it is ranked as a leading tourist destination. Forty percentage of the tourists come from the UK, with the US and Canada making up the next large groups of visitors to the island. In 2014, Transparency International's Corruption Perceptions Index ranked Barbados joint second in the Americas (after Canada, equal with the United States) and joint 17th globally (after Belgium and Japan, equal with the U.S., Hong Kong and Ireland).


Barbadian Olympic Triathlon Team

Here is the confirmed Barbadian triathlete to participate at the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Click on the athlete social media icons to read more about him.

Jason Wilson Triathlete

Jason Wilson was born on October 31, 1990 in Barbados. He will make history as the first Bajan triathlete to ever compete at an Olympic Games.

WTS Ranking: 58
WTS Starts: 15
Age: 25
Residence: Canada
Height: 1.80 m
Hobbies: -
Other Sports: Surfing
WTS Podiums: 0

View full results history of Jason Wilson Here

*Athlete information has been extracted from triathlon.org. Rankings and information may change as new data is added or corrections are made.

Since making their Olympic debut at Sydney 2000, triathletes have been pushing themselves to the limit in swimming, cycling and running, with the first to the finish line taking gold. There will be men’s and women’s individual events in Copacabana.


The Federation was formed in 1990 by a small group of practising triathletes who were attracted to a sport which was virtually new to the world and even newer to Barbados and the Caribbean at that time.


The International Triathlon Union was founded one year later, on April 1, 1989, at the first ITU Congress in Avignon, France. A total of 30 National Federations attended the initial Congress and preparations were made for the sport’s first World Championships to be held in Avignon in August of 1989. At this meeting the Olympic distance was set at a 1.5-km swim, 40-km bike and 10-km run. More than 800 athletes representing 40 countries competed in the first World Championships. Canada’s Les McDonald was elected as ITU’s first president in 1989.